Simeon Wilcher


Credit: Matt Kipp (@mattkipp5 on IG)

Five-star prospect Simeon Wilcher comes from a family of athletes and looks to follow his older brother C.J.’s footsteps when it comes to making an impact at the college level. Standing at 6’5” and 180 pounds as a rising junior, Wilcher does a good job maximizing his tools at both ends of the court. Being a smooth operator on offense and a feisty guard on defense help set him apart from the competition and make the most of his opportunities. His versatility, facilitating, finishing, creating, and mental edge all project as some of his differentiators, moving forward.


This summer, Wilcher is eager to pick up where he left off pre-COVID and show coaches how hard he’s been working to improve his game.


As part of the Pro Insight Q&A series, Wilcher discusses his strengths and weaknesses, his journey to becoming noticed on a national scale, his recruitment update, his off-court interests, and more.


For the next installment of the Pro Insight Q&A series, we present 2023 prospect Simeon Wilcher, from Plainfield, New Jersey:


Pro Insight: How did you get to where you are today?


Simeon Wilcher: I’m from Plainfield, New Jersey — kind of small town. I have four siblings: three older brothers and a little sister. I’m the youngest out of the four boys. Oldest brother C.J. just transferred to Nebraska. I’m very family-oriented, I like to enjoy my family on a daily basis and spend the time. There’s a lot going on right now and you never know when that time is up so I just like to enjoy their presence. I didn’t start off playing basketball, when I was younger I played a variety of sports like track and football. When I was around seven years old is when I really started taking basketball seriously.


PI: When did you shift full-time to basketball?


SW: Around seven years old is when I really started training and made basketball my main focus — so I kinda stopped with the other sports.


PI: What made you fall in love with basketball?


SW: I always played with my brothers if it was like going to the park and playing “21” or H.O.R.S.E. I always played, was around it, and watched it. Growing up I was a big KD fan. My brother C.J. played a big part in me wanting to play basketball.


PI: What are your current measurements?


SW: I’m 6’5” and 180 pounds and I don’t know my wingspan.


PI: For those that aren’t super familiar with your game — what are your greatest strengths?


SW: I feel like some of my greatest strengths are getting my teammates involved and being able to play both sides of the ball. I feel like good defense makes offense easier because it gives you way more freedom. And playing defense allows you to not call set plays because everybody gets out and runs and can score easily that way.


PI: You set a goal to average a certain amount of steals — how many did you end up averaging?


SW: I think I averaged around 4-4.5 steals/game. It varied throughout all our games, but it was around there.


PI: How would you describe yourself as a defender?


SW: I think I’m a pretty good defender — always room for improvement, but with my size and my length it kind of makes it harder for someone to get by me because I can move my feet, too. I think my footwork is pretty good. Especially if I’m guarding bigger guys who can handle it to the smaller guys who are quick and fast. I guard PG-SF at the high school level.


PI: What do you feel you still need to improve on the most? What have you been working on?


SW: I need to get better at everything in my game. I feel like everything is not perfect or where I want it to be right now. All aspects of my game from ball-handling, jump shots, defense, etc. could use improvement.


PI: What are some underrated parts of your game you feel you don’t get enough credit for?


SW: Feel like my passing ability is kind of underrated. I just like to put my teammates in positions to get easy baskets.


PI: You seem to play with a chip on your shoulder — where does that edge come from?


SW: I know a big portion of it was me not being able to play with COVID taking over and stopping AAU sports and sports period. Also with me, I feel like, if you really want something you have to take it. Just playing with a different type of anger, fire, and demeanor towards basketball because you never know when the ball is going to stop bouncing. So you’ve got to play every play or possession like it’s your last and that’s what I try to do when I step out there.


PI: Who has been the toughest individual matchup you’ve ever faced?


SW: I’ve played against a lot of good guys. I don’t know if there’s a certain one to point out more than others, but I’ve played against a lot of good guys.


PI: Do you model your game after anyone in particular?


SW: I try to model my game after Shai Gilgeous-Alexander of the OKC Thunder because he’s a lengthy guard who can score, but loves to involve his teammates. He also plays both sides of the ball.